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Astro Photography Tool for Camera Control

Astro Photography Tool Review
|Equipment|4 Comments

I have recently installed Astro Photography Tool on my dedicated astrophotography laptop.  From my very first imaging sequence, I knew I was going to like this application.

I recently used APT to capture the Whale Galaxy using a One Shot Color CCD camera.

There is no better way to learn a new imaging application than to put it to use for a night of deep sky imaging.  With clear night ahead of me, I dive into Astro Photography Tool to plan my Whale Galaxy astrophotography project.

In the video below, I also discuss my on-going transition from a DSLR camera to a cooled CCD.

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In this early review, I’ll talk about why APT is now my primary image acquisition and automation software.  After spending 2 amazing clear nights with it, I am extremely satisfied with APT’s intuitive user experience and helpful tools.

A User-Friendly Approach

I managed to successfully shoot lights, darks, bias, and flats my very first night using APT.

This is more than I can say about my first run with Sequence Generator Pro!  SGP is a fantastic astrophotography tool, but I find APT to be a better fit for my needs.

As I continue to learn how to get the most of my image control software, I will dive into some of the more advanced features. Features such as PointCraft and the Collimation aid (for my reflector) have gone unused thus far.

Click on the image below for a larger, uncropped version:

The Whale Galaxy

NGC 4631 – The Whale Galaxy

You can read more about my experiences photographing the Whale Galaxy, including the complete photography details here:  NGC 4631 – The Whale Galaxy

Astro Photography Tool Review

APT is the third image acquisition software I’ve used in the past 4 months.  My first camera control software experience was BackyardEOS.  Then, Sequence Generator Pro came into the picture due to my need for CCD image control. Finally, Astro Photography Tool has graced my imaging laptop screen, and I am happy to report that it appears as though I saved the best for last.

IAPT Logo‘d like to thank Steve at Ontario Telescope and Accessories for the recommendation.  I should have taken his advice sooner.

Astro Photography Tool reminds me a lot of BackyardEOS, and I don’t just mean the snazzy red interface (which I have since changed to gray).  In my opinion, the user interface is much more friendly for beginners than SGP was.

Fans of BackyardEOS will enjoy a similar feeling and user experience using APT.

The Author of APT actually launched the software before BYE.  So you might say that the APT had a role in inspiring future astro imaging tools. Astro Photography Tool has a loyal following of users, no doubt a result of the excellent customer service offered by the author.

Astro Photography Tool on Facebook

The fact that I jumped straight from Sequence Generator Pro to Astro Photography Tool between imaging sessions gave me a direct head-to-head comparison.

APT calls itself the “Swiss army knife” of astro imaging sessions.  APT offers an extensive support to a wide variety of cameras including brands like Canon, QHY, Atik, Orion and more. I run this software on my Windows 7 laptop.

Download a Trial Version of Astro Photography Tool

Pixel Aid in APT

Using Pixel Aid in Astro Photography Tool

The software boasts native support for SBIG and SBIG cameras, with ASCOM support for all other compatible cameras, filter wheels, focusers, and telescopes.




One feature I appreciated right away, was the detailed tooltip popup windows.  Literally, every button has an associated tooltip indicating what the button does, and when to use it.  APT also presents helpful reminders at key moments, such as “remember to cover the telescope”, before you run a series of darks.

APT also presents helpful reminders at critical stages of your imaging session, such as “remember to cover the telescope”, before you run a series of darks.  The developer clearly had the backyard imager in mind when designing this software.

Once you have a good understanding of the interface, you can easily turn off the tooltips by clicking the “i” button on the top right of the screen.

Why Astrophotographers use Camera Control Software

On the most basic level, astrophotography imaging software is used to control your DSLR or CCD camera.  The application connects directly to your camera and provides an advanced interface to automate the exposure sequences.

Deep Sky Astrophotography Setup

My telescope and camera pointed towards the Whale Galaxy

My first experience using a dedicated software for deep sky imaging was BackyardEOS.  Making the jump from Canon EOS Utilities to BYEOS for camera control was an eye-opener.  Not only could I run a series of events, but it had astrophotography specific tools for focusing and framing my object, and a lot more.

This completely changed the way I approached deep sky astrophotography.  The old days of using Canon EOS Utilities or a remote shutter release cable are long gone.  Applications like APT will make you a better photographer, by structuring your image events.

Camera control software lets you maximize the amount of light you collect on a clear night.

A Better Imaging Experience

APT user interface - screenshot

Running APT on my imaging laptop

All of the applications I have used for controlling my camera have had one thing in common; they make life easier.  The tools built into the software help me spend less time getting set up, and more time collecting photons.  The following list of benefits are true of all imaging control software:

Key benefits

  • controlling your camera
  • framing your target
  • focusing your telescope
  • monitoring your images
  • automatic dithering

 

Plate solving is the act of using the software in conjunction with your telescope mount to align your target over multiple nights.  I am yet to use this feature of APT, or any other of the imaging applications.  This could be a real time saver in the future, not to mention having frames that register perfectly with minimal overlapping.

An impressive exclusive feature to APT is the Bahtinov Aid.  This uses the Bahtinov Grabber technology to further improve the precision of your focus using a Bahtinov mask.

Sensor Temperature and Control

BackyardEOS would give me a readout as to how red-hot the sensor in my Canon T3i would get.  In the summer months, the sensor would rise to above 30 degrees using ISO 800 or above.  Running a DSLR in warm weather without any cooling can create a lot of noise in your astro image.

ZWO ASI071MC-COOL Sensor

Looking at the sensor in the ASI071

The noise was reduced by shooting dark frames, but noise removal was a still a time-consuming stage of my image processing workflow.  However, since I started using the ZWO ASI071MC-Cool, thermal noise is a thing of the past.

APT Cooling Aid

Running the Cooling Aid in APT

Astro Photography Tool includes a function called Cooling Aid, that assists you in controlling the temperature of your CCD Camera.  The tooltips of this function taught me a valuable lesson about cooling a CCD camera.

It suggested to slowly drop the temperature of the cooler in 3-degree intervals – over a period of 4-5 minutes.  This prevents thermal shock to the camera, and I had no idea about this issue until using the cooling aid in APT!

In my case, I set the target temperature for the ASI071 to -20 degrees C.  Not only does this level of control result in noise-free images but it also confirms that the dark frames I shoot are the exact same temperature.  Shooting dark frames in Astro Photography Tool is very straight forward.

APT vs. SGP

Before I compare these two image capture applications, I should mention, that Sequence Generator Pro was designed with the goal of complete automation in mind.  This includes having a permanent setup including an astrophotography mount on a pier, in a roofed observatory.

Perhaps if I was at this level, I would appreciate the features of SGP more.  Many of the advanced options within SGP went unused during my 45-day trial.  This includes plate solving, mount control, focus control and a lot more.  I do appreciate that SGP offers a free “Lite” version that continues to provide camera control and automatic dithering.

Astrophotography using Sequence Generator Pro

The Leo Triplet – captured using SGP for camera control

I am a more basic user, who sets up all of my astrophotography equipment each night.  I spend a lot of time outside next to my gear, not in a warm room or in the house.

Sequence Generator Pro

What I really liked about Sequence Generator Pro, was the Equipment Profile Manager.  Here, I was able to input my unique gear including camera and autoguiding preferences.  SGP would save all of the information for a quick setup the next time I was out imaging.

I also enjoyed the Flats wizard, once I learned how to use it!  The learning curve was due to my lack of CCD experience in general, rather than the process of taking flats.  Once I discovered that each camera has a target ADU for a successful flat frame, I was able to use the wizard to produce the right flats for the ASI071 through my telescope.

Sequence Generator Pro

I found Sequence Generator Pro a bit daunting to use at first.  I think that advanced imagers can have a hard time viewing software through the eyes of a beginner, as I know I have been guilty of excluding information about my workflow.

Astro Photography Tool 

At this point, I have only used APT for it’s most basic operations including running my exposure sequences and camera cooling.  The biggest difference I noticed when using this program was the overall ease of use and simplicity for my needs.

Image Capture Software for CCD Camera

My laptop running APT and PHD2 Guiding

I was able to spend minimal time adjusting settings, and get up and running right out of the gate.  Perhaps I got nostalgic about BackyardEOS and felt like this was the best CCD alternative.

APT is much more affordable than SGP, at $20US compared to $99US.  For my personal style and imaging goals, Astro Photography Tool will likely be my imaging control software of choice for years to come!

Supported DLSR’s

Which DSLR cameras can you use with Astro Photography Tool?

APT supported DSLR cameras

At the moment, Astro Photography Tool includes the ability to shoot with a Canon DSLR cameras.  Support for Nikon DSLR cameras in the future has been discussed in the APT forum, but it will take some time.  Unfortunately, because of the non-tethering nature of the API in Sony DSLR’s, software like APT or SGP do not have plans of supporting those cameras at this time.

If you have any experience using APT and have something to add, please let me know on Facebook.

Related Posts

Astrophotography | NGC 4631 – The Whale Galaxy

8 Deep Sky Targets for Galaxy Season

Resources:

Astro Photography Tool User Guide – Astroplace.Net

Astro Photography Tool vs. Backyard EOS – AstronomyForum.Net

Sequence Generator Pro – LightVortexAstronomy

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This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. Terry Powell says:

    Congratulations on your new auto guiding set up, you deserve it. The information you share is insightful and your delivery is easy to understand. Also congrats on the number of people viewing your videos, FB page, and your Astro Backyard page as well. This speaks highly of your content, and your approach to astronomy, and your delivery method as well. I hope you will continue this for many years to come. May your skies be forever clear (unless you need the rain) and my you’re soon to be wife’s patients for you and your hobby never run out.

  2. Trevor says:

    Thank you, Terry! As always, I appreciate your encouragement and I hope you continue to enjoy this ride along with me.

  3. Áron says:

    Tanks you for a lot of information! I tried the program but the camera didn’t connect becuase it is a sony camera.So ,can you recommend an other program witch compatible with sony cameras?

    • Trevor says:

      Hi Áron, APT doesn’t currently support Sony DSLR’s. I know that the developer plans on adding support for Nikon cameras soon. It doesn’t look like SGP supports Sony either, as Sony cameras do not have an API for tethering. Im sure a solution will surface for Sony users in the future. Good luck!

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