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Manual Stacking in Photoshop for Reduced Noise

|Image Processing|4 Comments

Even without a tracking mount, your astrophotography images can benefit from manual stacking in Photoshop.  This method involves aligning exposures and combining them into a master composite.  It can make a big impact on your astrophotos by reducing noise and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. [caption id="attachment_4045" align="aligncenter" width="713"] This night sky photo contains 11 exposures stacked manually in Photoshop[/caption] This technique requires no darks frames, no stacking software, and no tracking mount. The 2 software applications used in this tutorial are Adobe…

DSLR camera Ha filter

How a DSLR Ha Filter can Improve your Astrophotos

|H-Alpha|11 Comments

Some of the most incredible DSLR deep-sky images ever produced, likely combined regular RGB data (A typical color image) with images using a Ha filter.  A clip-in filter for your camera such as the Astronomik H-Alpha 12nm CCD filter makes it easy to start gathering Hydrogen-Alpha images with your existing DSLR. When it comes to astrophotography from a city backyard, narrowband filters such as H-Alpha allow you to collect detailed photos of many of your favorite nebulae and galaxies. The resulting greyscale images can then be applied to any existing full-color data you may have for an eve…

Full Moon

2016 Harvest Moon

|The Moon|0 Comments

Last night, I ventured to higher ground to photograph the 2016 Harvest Moon.  The forecast called for partly cloudy skies, with rain on the way later that night.  I knew it was a long-shot, but I figured that at least Rudy would get a walk out of the deal.  The Harvest Moon was slated to appear at approximately 7:33pm from my location, so I arrived at the park at about 7:00pm.  If you prefer to jump straight to the video, go ahead and scroll down to the end of the post!   Photographing the 2016 Harvest Moon   The equipment I chose to use for this photography venture was…

Camping under the stars

Finding Darker Skies

|Nebulae|2 Comments

Astrophotography in late August and early Septemeber feature ideal conditions for spending a full night photographing the stars. The nights are longer, the temperature is warm, yet cool at night, and the breathtaking Milky Way core continues to stretch upwards into the night, as nightfall sets in. Right now, some of the first stars to "pop" after the sun has receded behind the Earth are Vega, Altair, Deneb, and Arcturus. Even more noticeably present are the intense glowing "wanderers" known as Mars and Saturn in our Solar System. As the end of summer approaches, so does our nightly showin…