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Remove Gradients in Your Astrophotos with Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop is the preferred weapon of choice for many astrophotographers of varying levels of experience.  The intuitive user interface and limitless image processing capabilities make it a real contender in the astrophotography world.

The seamless integration with the .RAW image files produced by a Digital Camera makes Photoshop an attractive choice for photographers using popular Canon and Nikon DSLR’s.

It continues to be my personal favorite tool for processing astrophotography images.

The M78 nebula in OrionWhether you are brand new to astrophotography image processing, or a seasoned veteran, an uneven field in your image is something that every astrophotographer will deal with at some point.

The steps I will discuss below can be done in Photoshop without using any additional plugins. However, I strongly recommend investing in the Astronomy Tools Action Set, and Gradient Xterminator.  They are well worth the expense and can make a monumental difference to your images.

This Photoshop tutorial involves the following:

  •   Assessing your uneven field
  •   Removing the DSO from your image
  •   Creating a synthetic flat frame
  •   Subtracting the flat frame from your image

 

An Effective Photoshop Technique for Removing Gradients

One of the most time consuming and frustrating stages of your image processing workflow can be dealing with gradients.  Your background sky goes from a dark blue to pink as the encroaching glow of city light pollution stains your image.  Luckily, there is an extremely useful and effective method for removing gradients using Photoshop.

This method involves creating a synthetic flat frame and subtracting it from your original image.

Quickly correct your uneven field

The method you’ll see me use in the video below is a very popular way to remove gradients using Photoshop.  Variations of this technique have been used by amateur astrophotographers for years.  I do not take credit for this method.  Like almost everything else I have learned about this hobby, I picked this up by watching and reading countless image processing tutorials shared by others.

Video: How to Remove Gradients in Photoshop:

This technique works better on some deep-sky images better than others.  Large targets such as nebulae that fill the entire frame will be difficult to tackle using this process.  In my example, the Leo Triplet of galaxies worked very well, as they are surrounded by a large area of surrounding space.

Assessing the Data

  1. Start by opening up your final stacked image.  I use DeepSkyStacker to register and stack all of my image frames.
  2. Crop your image to remove the stacking artifacts and overlapping frames.
  3. Convert the image from 32bit to 16 bit, to open up further editing options in Photoshop.
  4. Perform a quick levels adjustment, bringing the left-hand slider up against the data on the histogram.
  5. Make a curves adjustment, pulling the details contained in your deep-sky object forward.
  6. By now, you should have a good idea of how bad the vignetting and color gradients are in your image.

 

Gradient issues in a astrophotography image

A curves adjustment will show the uneven field

Removing the DSO from the image

Now comes the fun part.  This is where you either have the option of running a third-party plugin such as Gradient XTerminator or tackling the issue yourself.  It’s beneficial to learn this method of removing gradients in photoshop for all types of astrophotography including wide field Milky Way shots.

  1. First, copy your original image layer and paste it on top.  Name it “Gradients”
  2. Copy this layer to a new image. Select All > Copy > File > New > Paste.
  3. On the new image that was just pasted, remove the deep sky objects from the field of view.

This can be done various ways, but I prefer to use the healing brush.  The important part to remember is that we are only interested in the color information of the background sky.  We don’t want to change the data found in the deep-sky objects themselves.  See this in action in the video above.

 

Using the healing brush in Photoshop

Remove the DSO using the healing brush

Creating a Synthetic Flat Frame

Now that we have a version of our image without our deep-sky object(s), we can correct the uneven field in the background sky.  At this point, you may also want to remove any bright stars that may negatively affect the resulting synthetic flat frame.

Richard Hum had this to say on YouTube:

What I usually find helpful is to use Select -> Colour Range -> Highlights to select the stars, and then do a content-aware fill. I find it works better than not removing the stars and just doing dust and scratches.

  1. Now, we need to blur the details of our copied DSOless image. Choose Filter > Noise > Dust and Scratches.
  2. For my camera’s resolution in the example, a Radius value of 80 pixels was used, and a Threshold of O.
  3. You should now see a blurred version of the background sky, with an evident uneven field.

 

creating a synthetic flat frame

Our synthetic flat frame

Applying the Flat frame to your Image

  1. Now, go back to your original image, and make sure you have the “Gradients” layer we created selected
  2. Next, choose Image > Apply Image.
  3. From the Source drop-down menu, select the copied, blurred image we just created. (Untitled-1)
  4. From the Blending Mode dropdown, select Subtract.
  5. Leave the Opacity at 100%, and set the Offset to 30 and hit, OK.

 

Deep sky astrophotography

Your new and improved image

Your new image with the gradients layer on top should look much better.  The “Gradients” layer we created can be scaled back by using the Opacity slider on the layer.  You may not need to use this layer at 100% to completely correct your gradient issues, but expect to have it set to between 80%-100% in most cases.




This layer can be toggled on and off to review and inspect the improvements to your image.  If necessary, you can go back and test some of the variables including changing the Radius value, and/or removing the stars before blurring the frame.

From this point, you can go about your image processing as you normally would, with a much improved, even background sky.

Wide field images captured with my camera lens suffer from horrible vignetting in my backyard.  The gradient removal technique above was used on this image of the Orion constellation to correct the background sky:

Orion constellation

The Orion constellation from my backyard

Try this method on some of your existing widefield images that suffer from a gradient in the background sky.  An uneven field is a common problem in almost all astrophotos, so mastering this technique will come in handy in your future endeavors.

Did you know you can sell your astrophotos as stock photography?  I have sold several of my images on Shutterstock over the past 3 years.  View my portfolio.

Thank you for your interest in AstroBackyard.  If you would like to contribute to this blog with an astrophotography article, please contact me.

You can stay up to date with the latest images and information on the AstroBackyard Facebook page, or by following me on Twitter and Instagram.

Until next time, clear skies!

Related Posts

Astrophotography Tutorials – AstroBackyard

Astrophotography Tutorial – Deep Sky Image Processing in Photoshop

Galaxy Season Target – The Leo Triplet of Galaxies

My Complete Deep Sky Astrophotography Equipment Setup

Beginner Astrophotography Telescopes – My Top Picks

Resources:

Astrophotography Tutorials – PhotographingSpace.com

Gradient Xterminator – Photoshop Plugin

Astronomy Tools Action Set – Pro Digital Software

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Deep Sky Image Processing in Photoshop

Well, this is it.  In this deep sky image processing tutorial, I’ll be combining all of the data I was able to collect on the Orion Nebula this winter.  As we transition into Spring, a new array of deep-sky imaging targets will present themselves.  The winter astrophotography targets in the Orion constellation will have to wait another year to get photographed.

Deep Sky Image Processing

Processing Walkthrough – Orion Nebula with a DSLR

Canon DSLR for astrophotography

The total amount of detail I was able to capture on M42 this winter was 3 Hours and 8 minutes of color RGB data.  I will be incorporating 2 hours and 40 minutes of Ha data into the final image using the HaRGB processing technique.  In this post, I’ll show you exactly how I process my image of the Orion Nebula using Adobe Photoshop.  I’ll start with the Autosave.tif file produced by DSS.

Some of the images used in my final photo were shot during the AstroBackyard YouTube video: Let’s Photograph the Orion Nebula.

DeepSkyStacker

The screenshot below shows the results of registering and stacking 4 nights worth of imaging from my backyard.  This winter has been plagued with numerous cloudy nights, so I had to capture photons here and there, under varying sky conditions.

Yes, it is very white!  That’s light pollution for you.

DeepSkyStacker

Orion Nebula stacked .TIF file in DeepSkyStacker

The photo sets from each imaging session were loaded into the group tabs of DeepSkyStacker.  My modified Canon T3i camera was set to ISO 800 for each imaging session, but I bumped the exposure time up to 3.5 minutes for the fourth and final set.

Using the group tabs in DSS

  • Dec 22, 2016 – 23 frames – 180″ @ ISO 800
  • Feb 2, 2017 – 24 frames – 180″ @ ISO 800
  • Feb 3, 2017 – 10 frames – 180″ @ ISO 800
  • Feb 27, 2017 – 11 frames – 210″ @ ISO 800

Image sets 1-3 were stacked using darks, bias and flat calibration/support frames. The final and fourth set did not use flat frames as I was not able to shoot them the morning after the imaging session.

I do not make any adjustments to the stacked image in DeepSkyStacker.  I bring the 32-bit Autosave.tif file into Adobe Photoshop for all post-processing.

Processing in Adobe Photoshop

I use two Photoshop Plugins in this tutorial, Astronomy Tools Action Set, and Gradient Xterminator.  See all of the astrophotography software I use here.

Cropping/Rotating the file in Photoshop

The first thing I like to do is to rotate and crop the image.  A temporary levels adjustment was made to get a better look at the edges of the frame.  As you can see, my frames rotated and shifted slightly between the imaging sessions.  This creates an unusable sky at the edges of the image, so I will crop the image to about 85%.  In the future, I plan to incorporate a plate-solving software such as AstroTortilla to help line up my images over multiple nights.

deep sky image processing

Rotating and cropping the image in Photoshop

To save some of the outer regions around the nebula, I will have to repair some of the outer background sky using the healing brush, and the content-aware fill tool in Photoshop.  Ideally, you would want to keep as much of your original frame as possible.  Once I have cropped the image, I will adjust the black point of the image.

Levels Adjustment / Setting Blackpoint

As you can see in the image below, the histogram shows that the majority of the image data in contained in the mid-level tones.  I will move the slider to the left of the histogram over until it touches the information contained within the image.  This will darken the background sky and increase the contrast of the original image.

Levels adjustment

the first levels adjustment creates much more contrast in the image

The slider to the right of the data was moved inwards as well.  Is is important that you do not clip the data and lose any pixel information.  You may notice that the core of the Orion Nebula is completely white and “blown out”, I will correct this issue later on.




Before setting the initial black-point, I will give the image a semi-aggressive curve stretch to reveal more of the outer nebulosity.  This will also discern where the nebula ends and the background sky begins. Before Photoshop will let us make this adjustment, we will need to convert the image from a 32-bit file to a 16-bit file.

Image > Mode > 16 Bits/Channel

An HDR Toning window will open up.  Avoid choosing the tempting default preset of Local Adaptation, and instead, select Exposure and Gamma from the Method selection area. Leave the default exposure and gamma settings.  As this tutorial moves on, we will be creating our own HDR (High Dynamic Range) version of the Orion Nebula using very specific actions and settings.

At this point, you can adjust the levels once more, as there is likely empty space to the left of the data in the histogram again.  You may also choose to create a copy of your original layer, or create a new adjustment layer to work from.  Having snapshots of your image at each stage of the processing workflow will help you go back and fine-tune your edits.  Personally, I like to use a mixture of new layer copies using the History feature of Adobe Photoshop.

Here is what my initial curve stretch looks like:

curves adjustment in Photoshop

 

The curves stretch I applied brought forward the fainter details of the outer nebulosity.

Here is a little trick I like to use: With the curves window open, hold down CTRL, and click an area of the nebula you want to bring forward.  This will plot a point on the histogram you can pull from to stretch that particular tonal range.  You can also plot an additional point of a neutral area of background sky, and know that you are pulling data forward from only the nebula itself, and not the space around it.

Levels Once the curve stretch has been applied there are two ways to set the black point of the image.  The Set Gray Point eyedropper in the levels window is great for a quick overall adjustment.  Although some astrophotographers will argue that this method results in a loss of overall range of data.   You can also manually set the color of your background sky by plotting a Color Sampler eye dropper in a neutral area of space.

Using the Info window, adjust the left-hand slider on each RGB level until the values are balanced.  A background sky with Red/Green/Blue values of about 30/30/30 is a good starting point.

Creating a star mask

If you don’t want to risk the chance of brightening the stars in your image and blowing them out, try using a layer mask to protect them from growing in size and intensity.  The art of stretching the deep-sky object, but not the stars is a constant challenge when processing astrophotography images.

You can create this mask by using the Color Range tool.  Select > Color Range.

Select Color RangeThen, use the eyedropper to select a medium-sized star within the frame.  Adjusting the Fuzziness slider will affect how much of the color range (and stars) will be selected.

You will have to experiment with the fuzziness slider to select your intended amount of stars.  In my example, I used a value of 140.  After the stars have been selected, I suggest softening the selection for a more natural blend in the mask.  To do this:

Select > Modify > Expand (2 Pixels)

Select > Modify > Feather (3 Pixels)

Again, these values will vary based on your image scale. If you are shooting wide field through a Canon T3i or similar model, these settings should work well.

Like many tasks in Photoshop, there are numerous ways to accomplish a layer mask adjustment.  For this step, I prefer to invert the selection of stars (Select > Inverse) and make my curve adjustment to all areas of the image except the star mask I created.

Here is what my image of the Orion Nebula looks like at this stage:

Image Processing - Orion Nebula

I cropped the image in a little more and used Gradient Xterminator around the edges of the DSO to balance the background sky.  Again, the core is still blown out at this stage.  I will add 2 additional stacks of 15 and 30-second images of the bright core to reveal the full range of detail in the Orion Nebula.

Astronomy Tools Action Set

At this stage of my image processing workflow, I will use my first action from Noel Carboni’s action set.   The action is called Local Contrast Enhancement.

This action does a great job at sharpening details and increasing the contrast of the deep-sky object.  It is wise to create a new layer with this action applied, so you can toggle the effect on and off.  For my image, I am going to apply a layer with this action at 75% opacity.  I have also created a mask on this layer so that it does not affect the areas of space where I do not want to increase the contrast.

Directly after this action, I prefer to run Enhance DSO and Reduce Stars.  This action can takes up to a minute or more to complete, depending on your image and the computer you are using.  Again, a new layer using this action is recommended, as this action can dramatically change the look of your image.

Here is a before/after look at my image after running Local Contrast Enhancement and Enhance DSO and Reduce Stars:

Photoshop actions before - after

Before and After applying actions in Photoshop

To make a new adjustment layer with all previous actions and adjustments made, use the keyboard shortcut: CTRL + ALT + SHIFT + N + E.  This is a very helpful technique to use as your continue to add adjustment layers to your image.

Applying the “Tamed Core” Layer

At this stage, I will apply a pre-processed stack of shorter exposures to the image.  To capture these images I shot a series of 15-second and 30-second exposures with the goal of collecting detail in the brightest areas of the Orion Nebula.  A good indicator of this dynamic range in values is the ability to discern the individual stars in the Trapezium.

The short exposures were stacked in DeepSkyStacker using dark, bias and flat frames just as the primary image was.

Orion Nebula Core ExposureThese layers were processed in the exact same fashion as the primary image.  This means that similar adjustments were made to the levels, curves, and actions – but in an isolated area.

Blending the two images will be a lot easier if they have been pre-processed in the same manner.  Some may argue that combining the core should have taken place much earlier in the process.  However, this timing of this workflow works best for my personal taste.  With so many opinions about how to properly process a deep sky image, I prefer to lean towards the workflow that I enjoy most.  This way, I can enjoy the hobby for years to come.

Here’s where it gets fun

Select the image of the detailed core, and paste it onto your original image as a new layer.  Rather than using a traditional mask method, I like to use a feathered eraser brush at an opacity of 15%.  This allows me to subtly remove the unwanted data on the top layer (the core), one brush stroke at a time.




When I need to see the faint details of the edges of the core layer, I simply create a 100% white layer and place it as the layer below.  The amount of brightness of the core is a matter of taste.  This aspect of the image has varying points of view as to how an HDR Orion Nebula is “supposed to look”.

I personally think that the Orion Nebula should have a bright core!  With the right amount of blending it is possible to show the full range of detail and keep the core as the brightest area of the image.  Flattening core to a lower brightness than the outer nebulosity can give the nebula a plastic look.

Blending the core

Layering in the core can take a long time if you are particular about the overall look of your image.  I used several copies of both stacks of shorter exposures to gradually work the new core into my existing image.

Final Processing Steps

With the full dynamic range captured in the image (depending on who you ask), I can now go ahead and make my final image processing steps to further increase the color and detail of the image.

Color sampler toolAt this point, I like to double check the levels of color in the background sky.  Using the Color Sampler Tool in 2 areas of the background sky indicates that the image is rather well balanced at the moment.

Increase Vibrance and Saturation

To increase the saturation of the Nebula without bringing noise and unwanted color from the background sky, I’ll use the Select Color Range tool again.  This time, use the eyedropper to select the color from the nebula you wish to intensify.  I choose the mid-level pink areas of Orion.

You may also want to run some actions on your image such as Increase Star Color, and Make Stars Smaller.  As always, apply these actions to a new layer so that you can control the amount of the adjustment using the opacity slider.  I will often use both of these actions, in small amounts.

Adding a layer of H-Alpha

This is where the image really starts to “pop”.  I shot over 2 hours worth of data through a 12nm Astronomik clip filter with my Canon T3i.  I will combine this data with the RGB image we just processed using the HaRGB processing technique outlined in this tutorial:

Deep Sky Image Processing in HaRGB – Tutorial

Orion nebula in Ha

The Orion Nebula in Ha

The image above is 32 X 5-minute subs @ ISO 1600

If you are interested learning how to shoot H-Alpha with your DSLR camera, read my post on how a DSLR Ha Filter can improve your astrophotography.

Without explaining every detail in the HaRGB tutorial I linked above, the premise is basically to add the Ha as a luminosity layer at about 75% over your original color image.

Because the data in the core of the H-Alpha version of Orion was blown out, it is important to note that I removed this area of the Ha luminosity layer, so that I did not lose any detail in the final composite image.  By turning the Ha layer off and on, you can determine which areas of the nebula are being improved, and which areas are losing detail and/or color.  I prefer to create another layer mask using the Ha layer, leaving only the key improvement areas at the full 75% opacity.

Below is my final image of the Orion Nebula using the processing methods outlined above:

Orion Nebula - AstroBackyard

Final Image Details:

Hardware:

Mount: Sky-Watcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan
Telescope: Explore Scientific ED102 CF
Imaging Camera: Canon T3i (600D) Modified
Filters: Hutech IDAS LPS, Astronomik 12nm Ha
Flattener/Reducer: William Optics FF III
Guide Scope: Orion Mini 50mm, Starwave 50mm
Guide Camera: Meade DSI, Altair Astro GPCAM2 AR0130

Software:

Image Aquisition: BackyardEOS
Autoguiding: PHD2 Guiding
Registering/Stacking: DeepSkyStacker
Image Processing: Adobe Photoshop CC

Exposure Details:

RGB: 3 Hours, 8 Minutes (55 frames)
Ha: 2 Hours, 40 Minutes (32 frames)
Total Integrated Exposure: 5 Hours, 48 Minutes

I am always looking to improve my deep sky image processing techniques.  For a video presentation of these techniques in action, please visit the AstroBackyard YouTube Channel.  If you like to see more of my deep sky astrophotography images, please have a look at the Photo Gallery.

AstroBackyardThis winter was a memorable one for me.  By sharing my experiences in the backyard on this blog and on YouTube, I was able to connect with fellow backyard astronomers on a deeper level.  There may not have been many clear nights, but the ones that were felt extra special.  Until next time, clear skies!

Deep Sky Image Processing Help:

Settings for DeepSkyStacker

Video Tutorial: Deep Sky Image Processing in Photoshop

 

 

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Forgotten Light Frames

|Nebulae|0 Comments

While digging though some old folders on Adobe Bridge, I stumbled across some unprocessed, 300 second light frames of the Flaming Star Nebula from November 2013!  When you are desperate to get out and image a new target, this is like hitting gold.  I was originally looking for my raw files of the Pacman Nebula, which I feel is in desperate need a new process. (Those stars look pretty rough)  I found a folder labelled “Flaming Star – 5 Min Lights”.  I never processed this image!  The Flaming Star Nebula is a colorful collection of glowing gas and dust lit up by the bright star AE Aurigae.  The tough part about this process will be the limited exposure time.  1 hour of data is really not ideal for a quality astrophotography image.  I find that out the hard way below:

IC 405 – The Flaming Star Nebula

IC 405 - Flaming Star Nebula

 

Photo Details

Photographed on: November 29, 2013

Telescope: Explore Scientific ED80 with WO Flat III 0.8x FR/FF
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan
Guiding: Meade DSI Pro II and PHD Guiding
Guide Scope: Orion Mini 50mm
Camera: Canon EOS 450D (Stock)
ISO: 1600
Exposure: 1 hour (12 x 300s)
Processing Software: Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop CC
Support Files: 15 darks

Guided with PHD Guiding
Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker
Processed in Adobe Photoshop CC

This image was acquired using Canon EOS Utilities, and not BackyardEOS as I use now.  This was photo was also shot before I modified my Canon 450D for astrophotography.

Now you might be thinking “how could you spend hours imaging a nebula and forget to process it?”  It’s simple – life is busy!  I likely had a busy week following the the imaging session, and began I new session before I even looked at the precious data collected on that cold November night.  I don’t see any dark frames to support the image.  This may have been another reason I held off.  I bet that I wanted to take 5 minute darks of the same temperature before stacking, but never got around to it.  This could be a problem.

 

But first, let’s get this cleared up

This is budget Astrophotography.  Most of my gear was purchased used from online forums and astronomy classifieds.  The total value of the equipment used to photograph this nebula was purchased for under $3,000.  It’s not top-of-the line gear by any stretch of the imagination.  My astrophotography image processing skills were self-taught.   I am no scientist, that’s for sure.  Just like you, I have a strong desire to capture beautiful images of the night sky.  I always appreciate constructive criticism, and enjoy helping others learn through my mistakes.

 

Stacking without Dark Frames?

First of all, I’ll have to use dark frames from a different night to stack with the Flaming Star light frames.  This means that it is very important to match the temperature of my light frames from that night of imaging.  I have done a poor job of creating a master dark library, so finding matching dark’s may be tough.  I usually try to record the temperature of my dark frames in the file folder, for this very situation.  There are external software applications available that can help create a dark frame library, such as Dark Library.  I remember using this years ago, but their website appears to be down right now.  I will use the 5 minute dark frames from my Pacman Nebula image taken earlier that month, labelled 4 degrees.  Another option is to just stack the light frames without any dark’s.  I’ll try both and compare the two.

 

Here is the version stacked with no dark frames:

Deep Sky Stacker with No Darks

Here is the version using dark frames from a previous night:

Deep Sky Stacker with Darks

 

As you can see, stacking with the dark frames produced a better result.  Even though the temperature of dark frames did not match perfectly, the dark frames removed some of the dead pixels and noise from the image.  Notice the red streak of dead pixels on the “no-darks” version.  All of these imperfections would become intensified after processing!  I performed a few basic edits to the examples above to have a better look at the differences. (Levels, Gradient Xterminator, and Curves)  Now that we have registered and stacked our 1 hour’s worth of data, let’s start stretching the data in Photoshop.

 

How to take proper Dark Frames for Deep Sky Stacker

The answer to this and more in the FAQ section

Processing the Image in Photoshop

If you have followed any of my astrophotography tutorials on my website, or video tutorials on YouTube, you already know the basics of my processing workflow.  This process has evolved over the years as I learn new tricks.  However, processing the Flaming Star Nebula was particularly tough because of the limited exposure time on the subject.  Add in the fact that this nebula is quite faint, with many bright stars surrounding it, and you’ve got an astrophotography challenge for even the most experienced astrophotographer.

 

Quick Astrophotography Tip

Try to frame your deep-sky object in an interesting way.  Include nearby star clusters, nebulae or galaxies.  For inspiration, search for your target on APOD, and see how the professionals have framed the object.  This may spark your creativity to photograph an existing target in a different way.

HLVG – Green Noise Remover

The entire image had a noticeable green cast over it, perhaps because of the extreme amount of noise, or the miss-matched dark frames.  I ran Deep Sky Colors HLVG on medium, which helped a lot.  HLVG was created by Rogelio Bernal Andreo of RBA Premium Astrophotography.  It is a chromatic noise reduction tool that attempts to remove green noise and the green casts this noise may cause in your astrophotography image.  It is based on PixInsight’s SCNR Average Neutral algorithm.  If you don’t already have this useful filter for Photoshop, I highly recommend it, it’s free!  You can download the plugin here:

Hasta La Vista, Green!

HLVG Filter for astrophotography

Results and Thoughts

I must admit, this post became a bit of a nightmare.  I began to document my processing steps one by one, taking screenshots of progress along the way.  I wanted to provide a detailed tutorial of how I turned this forgotten data into a masterpiece, despite having no associated dark frames, and only an hour’s worth of exposure time.  As I experimented using different methods of noise reduction, and various orders of operations, I became very discouraged with my final image results.  I spent hours taking different roads with all of my trusted astrophotography tools at my disposal, and the results continued to be unimpressive.  By adjusting the curves enough to show any substantial detail on the nebula, I introduced a frightening amount of noise into the background space.  No amount of noise reduction could remove it, without turning the entire image into a blurry mess.

I just couldn’t bring myself to post a tutorial with the end result turning out like it did.  So I scrapped the idea, and settled for a forgettable image of the Flaming Star Nebula.  Surely this gorgeous nebula that spans 5 light years across deserves more than that.

Astrophotography Processing Tutorial

My unused processing tutorial screenshots

At the end of the day:

No amount of processing can make up for lack of exposure time!

I guess you could say I was doomed from the start.  I am not going to spend any more time on this image until I am able to capture at least another 2 hours of data on it.  I hope you can learn from my experiences in astrophotography, in both victories and failures.  But I guess that’s why you’re here 🙂  Please follow AstroBackyard on Facebook for the latest updates.

 

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