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M33 Galaxy – The Triangulum Galaxy

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M33 Galaxy

M33 – The Triangulum Galaxy

The Triangulum Galaxy

The M33 Galaxy is the third-largest galaxy in the local-group of galaxies, behind the Milky Way and Andromeda.  Its large size from our vantage point makes my wide-field astrophotography 80mm telescope a great choice for imaging this target. Despite it’s size, the Triangulum Galaxy appears much dimmer than M31 – The Andromeda galaxy.  If you are new to astrophotography, chances are that the Triangulum Galaxy is one of the first few galaxy names you have learned.

M33 Galaxy Photo Details:

Telescope: Explore Scientific ED80 with WO Flat III 0.8x FR/FF
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan
Guiding: Meade DSI Pro II and PHD Guiding
Guide Scope: Orion Mini 50mm
Camera: Canon EOS 450D (Modified)
ISO: 800
Total Exposure: 7 Hours (84 x 300 seconds)
Processing Software: Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop CC
Support Files: 20 darks, 20 flats, 20 bias

Target Acquired – Messier 33

I have managed to image the M33 Galaxy from my backyard for multiple nights over the course of nearly a week. I can’t remember the last time we have had such a long stretch of clear night skies in the Niagara region. Mind you, these clear nights occurred during weekdays, and I have to be up early for work (and to walk the dog) early each morning. Needless to say, I haven’t been getting much sleep lately.  Luckily my astrophotography equipment can be set up and ready for imaging in about 30 minutes. This includes polar alignment, calibration, focus and guiding.  

M33 Galaxy - Astrophotography

My Telescope pointed at the M33 Galaxy

But first, the Elephant’s Trunk

My first imaging session was on the night of September 16th. Smack-dab in the middle of the work week. I didn’t originally intend to shoot the M33 galaxy that night, I started with IC 1396. The Elephant’s Trunk nebula is a concentration of interstellar gas and dust within IC 1396, located in the constellation Cepheus. You can view the results of this project below.

This area of the night sky is in a perfect spot for imaging at this time of year from my location, almost directly overhead. I captured 38 frames on this DSO on Wednesday night. The subs were 4 minutes each using ISO 800 on my aging modified Canon Xsi.

IC 1396 – Elephant’s Trunk Nebula

Elephant's Trunk Nebula

IC 1396 – Elephant’s Trunk Nebula – A tad noisy!

IC 1396 – Astrophotography Image Details

Telescope: Explore Scientific ED80 with WO Flat III 0.8x FR/FF
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan
Guiding: Meade DSI Pro II and PHD Guiding
Guide Scope: Orion Mini 50mm
Camera: Canon EOS 450D (Modified)
ISO: 800
Total Exposure: 2 Hours, 24 Minutes (36 x 240 seconds)
Processing Software: Deep Sky Stacker, Photoshop CC
Support Files: 15 dark frames

The Elephant’s Trunk nebula can be seen in the top center-right of the photo above. It is a dark patch with a bright, sinuous rim. The rim is the surface of a dense cloud that is being illuminated and ionized by a very bright, massive star. Faint objects like this are difficult to image from light-polluted skies in the city. I found myself battling with horrible gradients and noise when processing this image. I will likely add more time to the Elephant’s Trunk Nebula during the weeks that surround the new moon in October. Another 4 hours should help me pull out more detail with less noise.

Canon 450D attached to my telescope

Canon Xsi 450D for astrophotography – attached to my telescope with the William Optics 0.8 FF

On to the M33 Galaxy…

After achieving a steady graph in PHD guiding, and a tight-focus on my reference star (Alderamin) I set BackyardEOS to take 50 frames, and I headed to bed.  I set my alarm for 2:00am, and managed to stumble back out to the patio to check on my results.  The Elephant’s trunk nebula was too far west, and my telescope would soon by aiming directly at my garage!  Because the sky was still crisp and clear, I figured I would add some time a second object for the night.  I imaged the M33 Galaxy back in 2012, but that was before I self-modded my 450D for astrophotography.  The Triangulum Galaxy contains some beautiful pink nebulosity within it that I knew I could now capture.

The following 2 nights of the week were also clear, and I took full advantage. This time, I shelved my plans for the Elephant’s trunk, and focused all of my efforts on Messier 33. I captured an impressive 49 subs the following night at 5 minutes each, and then I added another 17 light frames the night after that!

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M33 Galaxy

M33 – The Triangulum Galaxy

My total number of frames on this object was now over 100! That’s a lot of imaging in one week. All that was left now was to stack and process all of the data acquired. I set Deep sky stacker to use “the best 90% of frames” to register and stack, which resulted in a final stack of 84 images total, or exactly 7 hours. I even had success with my creation of flat and bias frames. I shot the bias frames through the telescope with the lens cap on, at the fastest shutter speed my camera allows (1/4000 of a second). The flat frames were created by shooting through the telescope, pointed at the early morning blue sky. These were shot with the camera in Av mode. I shot separate bias and flat frames for each night, except the first. Only dark frames were used for that imaging session.

Processing a photo with 7 hours worth of data is quite enjoyable.  There is less noise, and more detail than I am used to.  As with all of my astrophotography images, I am sure I will re-process my photo of Messier 33 several times until I feel like I have done the galaxy justice. Everyone has their own taste, and at the end of the day, you have to be happy with it.

BackyardEOS 3.1

I finally purchased a copy of BackyardEOS 3.1 Classic Edition. My trial period has ended, and I am very happy with the software. The focus and framing tab, dithering control, and file organization features are my favourite, and make me wish I had upgraded to this software a lot sooner. I always had a hard time getting accurate focus using the live-view function of my DSLR. The focusing function built-in to BackyardEOS allow you to view a digital readout of the star size in real-time as you focus your telescope. The lower number you see on-screen, the better your focus! The filename for each sub lists the ISO, object name, exposure time, date and even the temperature! This is extremely handy when stacking a large number of frames from multiple nights.

BackyardEOS

Screenshot of the BackyardEOS 3.1 Software

I would love to hear what you think of my results for this galaxy image.  You can also follow me on twitter to see more of the “behind-the-scenes” stuff from the backyard. As always, if you have any questions about the equipment I used, or my processing techniques, please leave a comment below.  Thank you so much for visiting my website.

Backyard Astrophotography

Another night under the stars in the backyard

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Sadr Star – Intersection of the Northern Cross

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Photographing the Sadr Star in Cygnus

If you follow me on Twitter, you may have noticed that I was poking around in the middle of the constellation Cygnus last weekend, specifically centered on to the extremely bright Sadr star. I really wanted to post a really snazzy wide field photo of this region on this blog, but I was unhappy with my results.

I set my mount and telescope up for imaging in the South, at the far edge of my backyard. This spot was a poor location for shooting straight up overhead at the constellation Cygnus for me, as I ran into trees by 1:30 am. The result, only 1 hour of total exposure on a hot night. Even the stacked final image including 15 dark frames was noisy after stretching! 

I was already sad about the trees, but after seeing my noisy photo, I was Sadr. (anyone?) Clearly, I need more time on it.

The night was not a complete waste. Aside from the mosquito bites and the ever constant worry from my neighbors “what is he doing out there!?”, I was able to snap this neat little photo of the Summer Triangle. The stars that make up this giant asterism are Altair, Vega, and Deneb. For this shot, I used my Canon 70D and 17-40mm lens, riding on the Sky-Watcher mount.  15 – 40-second shots were stacked together for the final image.

The Summer Triangle

The Summer Triangle

 

Tonight’s the Night – Gamma Cygni

Location of the Sadr Star

With the almost first-quarter moon setting tonight around midnight, and clear, cool skies in the forecast for the Niagara region, it looks like I am set for round 2 tonight. Tomorrow night looks clear as well, will this be the weekend of the Sadr Star? That might be the nerdiest thing I have ever said.  That’s not true.

Tonight, I will position the mount for an all-night-long session in Cygnus. My plan is to frame Gamma Cygni directly in the center. From the other images of this area, it looks like I should pick up a lot of nebulosity throughout the frame.

My 30-day trial of Backyard EOS is still in effect, so I am happy to use it’s handy imaging features for another free night before shelling out the $50 US for the full version. A fair price for this impressive software. See the star map to the left for an idea of where I will be shooting tonight. If all goes well, my next post will be a portrait of the intersection of the Northern Cross.

 
 

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Wizard Nebula through 80mm Telescope

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The Wizard Nebula through my 80mm Telescope

Clear August Nights

More consecutive clear summer nights have allowed me to put in some serious time on the Wizard Nebula!  In fact, this is the most amount of exposure time I have put into any object!  Over 7 Hours! Truth be told, I would have hopped over to a new subject, but this attractive nebula is in the sweet spot of the sky right now.

View an updated image of the Wizard Nebula using my current astrophotography equipment.

Wizard Nebula 80mm telescope

The Wizard Nebula using an 80mm Refractor Telescope

NGC 7380 – Wizard Nebula Details:

Total Exposure Time:  7 Hours, 15 Minutes (87 x 5 Minute Subs)

Telescope Mount: Skywatcher HEQ-5 Pro Synscan
Camera and Telescope: Modified Canon 450D through Explore Scientific ED80

Guided with PHD Guiding
Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker
Processed in Adobe Photoshop CC

NGC 7380 (also known as the Wizard Nebula) was discovered in 1787 by Caroline Herschel.  It is an open cluster located in the constellation of Cepheus.  The large nebula is extremely difficult to observe visually!

Travel Astrophotography Equipment

I have recently moved into an apartment, so I cannot image from home. To get my imaging fix I have to set up my scope in a friend’s backyard across town.  I leave it unattended all night long and cross my fingers everything worked out in the morning!  It’s a bit nerve-racking thinking about my expensive equipment running all night with no supervision, but I have my procedure down-pat and can count on good results now.

View my updated portable astrophotography setup

explore_scientific_ed80_telescope

I have been using my small refractor a lot lately because it is just so darn easy to transport and setup!  Not to mention that there is no need to collimate it like a Newtonian.  My Orion 8″ Newtonian Reflector is in desperate need of collimation at the moment (Oval stars!).  Until I can use a friends laser collimating tools, I will continue to shoot wide-field shots with the ED80.

Orion has started popping up in the mornings now, a familiar sign that summer is coming to an end.  I am excited to shoot one of my favorite winter objects (M78) with the 8″ Orion!

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Rosette Nebula – Stock Canon DSLR

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How the Rosette Nebula looks with a Stock DSLR

Will an unmodified Canon DSLR pick up the red nebulosity?

Happy New Year! I was finally graced with some clear skies that showcased the beautiful winter milky way on Monday. The moon was about 19% lit, and didn’t set until about 10:30pm, so about half of data in the photo above was captured with the moon still out. The sky conditions were so fantastic on Monday, it was a shame I had to leave early to get a good night’s sleep for work the next morning.

The Rosette Nebula (Caldwell 49) is a large circular HII region. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula’s matter.

Rosette Nebula Stock

 

Caldwell 49 – The Rosette Nebula
Imaged Monday, February 3, 2014

38 subs, 3.5 Minutes Each totaling 2 Hours 13 Minutes

I used the Explore Scientific 80ED telescope for this photo because the size of this object is quite large. I am quite happy with my end result, although I plan on processing the photo several more times to try and pull out as much detail as possible.

I highly recommend Noel Caboni’s “Astronomy Tools” action set for Photoshop. I found it very helpful when processing this image, and every other image I have taken. For the price of a cheap filter, you can drastically improve your astrophotos. Well worth it!

Complete Astrophoto Details

Telescope: Explore Scientific ED80 with WO Flat III 0.8x FR/FF
Tracking Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro Synscan
Guiding: Meade DSI Pro II and PHD Guiding
Guide Scope: Orion Mini 50mm
Camera: Canon EOS 450D (Stock)
ISO: 1600
Exposure: 2 hours 13 Minutes (38 x 210s)
Processing Software: Calibration and Stacking in Deep Sky Stacker, Levels/Curves/Enhancements in Photoshop CC
Support Files: 12 darks

 

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