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H-Alpha

Astrophotography with a 12nm ha filter

|Camera|6 Comments

With the aid of an Astronomik 12nm Ha filter, I can capture deep-sky images more often than ever before. With both the Canon EOS clip-in version for my DSLR and the 2" CCD round mounted version for the my dedicated astronomy camera, I collect photons in every moon phase. Despite the bright 80% illuminated moon this past Saturday night, I was able to capture some incredible deep sky photos of 2 deep sky emission nebula targets from my backyard in the city. Using my 102mm refractor telescopes, I collected isolated wavelengths of light on the Wizard Nebula in the constellation Cepheus, and Bub…

Short Nights and Hot Sensors

|Nebulae|2 Comments

The hot nights of early summer astrophotography start late and end early. The warm temperatures at night make their presence known in my DSLR images in the form of noise. My latest deep sky project involves capturing data on NGC 6888 in H-Alpha with a DSLR.  My highly portable astrophotography equipment allows me to move the entire rig around the yard based on my imaging target. This month, I have been getting a head start on summer Astro targets in Sagittarius such as the Omega Nebula. This means waiting until after midnight for my targets to rise high enough in the Southeast for a…

Deep-Sky Astrophotography During a Full Moon

|The Moon|11 Comments

The clouds have parted, and I have enjoyed 2 cold, clear nights of astrophotography back-to-back! This is a fortunate occurrence that doesn’t come very often, especially during a Canadian winter. However, the moon is nearly full, rising in the late evening in it’s waning gibbous phase. This reminds me of a question that comes up time and time again. Is deep-sky astrophotography during a full moon a waste of time? The moon reflects bright sunlight into the sky for about a week on either side of a full moon.  This moonlight floods the sky and is so bright that it washes out faint deep-sk…

DSLR camera Ha filter

How a DSLR Ha Filter can Improve your Astrophotos

|H-Alpha|11 Comments

Some of the most incredible DSLR deep-sky images ever produced, likely combined regular RGB data (A typical color image) with images using a Ha filter.  A clip-in filter for your camera such as the Astronomik H-Alpha 12nm CCD filter makes it easy to start gathering Hydrogen-Alpha images with your existing DSLR. When it comes to astrophotography from a city backyard, narrowband filters such as H-Alpha allow you to collect detailed photos of many of your favorite nebulae and galaxies. The resulting greyscale images can then be applied to any existing full-color data you may have for an eve…