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Winter deep sky astrophotography

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November is an exciting month for backyard astrophotographers as we transition into a new season of fantastic winter deep sky targets.  These constellations contain some of the best nebulae and star clusters the sky has to offer. The colder temperatures mean less noise in your images, which is great news for DSLR camera owners. The image of the Horsehead Nebula above is combined data from 2015 and this month.  View the complete photo details here. The winter deep sky targets in Orion are arguably the best of the Northern Hemisphere. With my recent addition of a modified Canon T3i…

Manual Stacking in Photoshop for Reduced Noise

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Even without a tracking mount, your astrophotography images can benefit from manual stacking in Photoshop.  This method involves aligning exposures and combining them into a master composite.  It can make a big impact on your astrophotos by reducing noise and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. [caption id="attachment_4045" align="aligncenter" width="713"] This night sky photo contains 11 exposures stacked manually in Photoshop[/caption] This technique requires no darks frames, no stacking software, and no tracking mount. The 2 software applications used in this tutorial are Adobe…

DSLR camera Ha filter

How a DSLR Ha Filter can Improve your Astrophotos

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Some of the most incredible DSLR deep-sky images ever produced, likely combined regular RGB data (A typical color image) with images using a Ha filter.  A clip-in filter for your camera such as the Astronomik H-Alpha 12nm CCD filter makes it easy to start gathering Hydrogen-Alpha images with your existing DSLR. Narrowband filters are an astrophotographers best friend.   The Astronomik H-Alpha 12nm Clip Filter for Canon DSLR'S This narrowband filter lets the h-alpha light of emission nebulae pass through to the camera sensor, and blocks almost all of the other light spec…