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NGC 2244 – The Rosette Nebula

NGC 2244 – The Rosette Nebula

NGC 2244 - The Rosette Nebula

NGC 2244 – The Rosette Nebula in HaRGB

Link to Latest Version Posted on Astrobin

RGB (Full color) photo details

Photographed on: February 3, 2014

Telescope: Explore Scientific ED80 with WO Flat III 0.8x FR/FF
Mount: Sky-watcher HEQ-5 Pro
Guiding: Meade DSI Pro II and PHD Guiding
Guide Scope: Orion Mini 50mm
Camera: Canon EOS 450D (Stock)
ISO: 1600
Total Exposure: 2 Hours, 13 Minutes (38 x 3.5 minute frames)
Processing Software: DeepSkyStacker, Photoshop CC
Support Files: 15 dark frames

Guided with PHD Guiding
Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker
Processed in Adobe Photoshop CC

Rosette Nebula Ha

Ha (H-Alpha) Photo details

Photographed on: January 15, 2014

Telescope: Explore Scientific ED102 with WO Flat III 0.8x FR/FF
Mount: Sky-watcher HEQ-5 Pro
Guiding: Meade DSI Pro II and PHD Guiding
Guide Scope: Orion Mini 50mm
Camera: Canon EOS 600D (Modified)
ISO: 1600
Total Exposure: 2 Hours, 20 Minutes (28 x 5-minute frames)
Processing Software: DeepSkyStacker, Photoshop CC
Support Files: 15 dark frames

Guided with PHD Guiding
Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker
Processed in Adobe Photoshop CC

 

About the Rosette Nebula

This beautiful deep-sky object is a large nebula located in the constellation Monoceros.  It is a cosmic cloud of gas and dust that lies approximately 5000 light years away, and has a flower-like appearance.  The petals of this rose are actually a stellar nursery where new stars are being born.  The striking shape of this nebula was sculpted by the winds and radiation from the cluster of young stars in the center of the Rosette known as NGC 2244.  This nebula can be viewed using a telescope under dark skies, towards the constellation of Monoceros the Unicorn.

 

Astrophotography with an 80mm Telescope

 

This can be a challenging nebula to photograph because it appears in our winter night sky, when the nights are cold and unforgiving.  In Southern Ontario, the months of December through March are the cloudiest of the year, and that is precisely when the Rosette Nebula is at it’s highest in our night sky!

I have a video tutorial on my Youtube channel where I stack and process my image of the Rosette Nebula captured with my Canon Xsi and 80mm Refractor Telescope.  In this video I use the 3.5 minute light frames that I previously captured, and stack them using Deep Sky Stacker.  I then take the image in Adobe Photoshop for image processing to really bring out the color and detail of this deep-sky wonder.

 


 

View the rest of my Nebula Photography…